These Maps And Charts Strike That Not A Single Country In The World Is Corruption-Free

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The devastating examples fuelled by the corruption that world is facing today are child labour, human trafficking, child mortality, poor education standards, environmental destruction and terrorism.

One of the main and major sector which is fueling corruption is the public sector. Public sector corruption is much more than the missing money which results to such devastating examples of life.

Put simple – the emergence of the sad state of life (survival) which in any case we don’t want to face it but it is happening around. It is much happening around!

Based on the expert opinion, the Corruption Perceptions Index measures the perceived levels of public sector corruption worldwide.

The appalling fact that it came across that not even one single country, anywhere in the world, is corruption-free.

The Transparency International index is calculated using 12 different data sources from 11 different institutions that capture perceptions of corruption within the past two years.

The Corruption Perceptions Index 2015 ranked 169 countries for corruption, finding that the two countries tied with a score of eight out of 100.

The 2015 Corruption Perceptions Index clearly shows that corruption remains a blight around the world. But 2015 was also a year when people again took to the streets to protest corruption. People across the globe sent a strong signal to those in power: it is time to tackle grand corruption, says Jose Ugaz, Chair, Transparency International.

Corruption Charts


Brazil and Lesotho declined the most in the index, by five points each, in Brazil’s case partly due to the unfolding Petrobras scandal which lead to riots in the country.

Corruption Charts


In terms of what the world looks like by index score, the below map shows that African and Asian countries are typically more prone to corruption, at least by this year’s scores.

You can also view an interactive version of this map here.

Corruption Charts

And below the map tells how the scores have changed since the 2014 index, which shows that South America has shown the greatest decline of all continents.

You can also view an interactive version of this map here.

Corruption Charts

In Angola, 70 percent of the population live on US$2 a day or less. One in six children dies before the age of five – making it the deadliest place in the world to be a child. More than 150,000 children die each year. But not everyone’s suffering.

The disturbing fact is that five of the 10 most corrupt countries also rank among the 10 least peaceful places in the world.

“Corruption will stop only when we collectively fight against it,” says photographer AM Ahad of his sad portrait of the nine-year-old child worker in Bangladesh which tells that instead of going to the school, she spends her days sorting bottles at a recycling factory.

“It is crucial that we change the common mentality of accepting corruption and treat the crime as the terrible thing that it is.”

Explore Transparency International’s full Corruption Perceptions Index map below:

Cover Image Source: Transparency International.


Ayush Garg

Content Developer. Strategist. (A true) Startup Enthusiast. A kind of a guy who relies on analysis, and writes to spoil the masks. A threat to humor, if one liners could kill. Twitter: @profylayush.

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