Pakistan Is Making A Fool Of Itself With The Mission Of Bans

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We will all agree that there has certainly been a rise in the recent attacks on India. We will all also agree on crediting these attacks to Pakistan. However, what most of us will not agree on is whether banning artists, artisans, business entities and alike is right or wrong.

There have been a number of arguments. Some people feel that art and livelihood should always be kept aside from war and politics. Some feel that there cannot be one section of a country making merry with the ‘enemy’ and another have them fight day and night. Both these arguments are right for some and wrong for others. But whether it’s right or wrong in your opinion, the ban as it looks is here to stay.

What is important to understand at this point is that the ban is not a game of tit for tat. The idea behind the ban on Pakistani artists and business entities in India should be to force these people to force their government to take action against terrorism, rather say the sponsored terrorism from their own country. If the ban is just reduced to a game of an eye for an eye, the world will definitely go blind.

While I would like to believe that the Indian decision to ban Pakistani citizens from working here has a more thought of and logical approach to it, the ban on Indian movies and channels’ broadcast in Pakistan just seems to boil down to pure vengeance and retribution. The never ending circle of hatred and blame seems to be on a roll when you look at the recent bans progressing out on Indian movies in Pakistan. Could there be any logic of banning the screening of M.S. Dhoni biopic in Pakistan?

Indian films and businesses have always contributed a huge deal to Pakistan’s economy. In this case, the decision to ban the movies is nothing but adding fuel to fire. There is no tactical approach to it, and it definitely is a technique to garner attention worldwide. It also makes it amply clear that a peaceful or calculated approach on this matter is ‘far from possible’ from Pakistan.

It also makes one wonder, what is the fate of the export-import relationship of India and Pakistan. Pakistan is dependent on India for a number of imports, what is the fate of their economy if this was all stopped altogether?

If India revokes the title of the ‘Most Favoured Nation’, it so agreeably gave to Pakistan, what is going to be the state of Pakistan’s economy? The MFN concept is an integral part of the WTO agreements and is among the doctrines that serve as the foundation of the multilateral trading system. Pakistan can lose their open trade benefits in India. Had the same title been bestowed upon India, what could be the future of Pakistan’s economy?

India is an upper riparian state. So far in the spirit of goodwill, India has honoured the Indus treaty. What happens when India decides otherwise? ‘Economy’ and ‘Nations’ are fancy words for a few. What happens to the ‘people’ who lose water? We recently saw what scarcity of water has caused in the Karnataka–Tamil Nadu Cauvery dispute. Is Pakistan ready for a similar debacle?

And while India may seem as the considered and mature nation, who is all for the soldier and solidarity, if the recent decision to reduce the disability pension isn’t a stab in the back, then what is it, and more importantly, why?

Makes you wonder a few things, doesn’t it?



Meghna Thakur

A language student currently pursuing masters in French. Being an army brat and hence having travelled a lot, I like to believe I’ve acquired quite an understanding of life for my age. Hoping to make more sense of it by winning lots of wisdom, experience, a little bit of hogwash, and lots and lots of love. Being able to master skills that pay my bills along the way would be an added bonus.

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