NASA Makes Dozens Of Patents Available For Free To Foster Entrepreneurship

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If you’re interested in checking out technologies developed by NASA over the years, you can now access thousands of expired patents using the space agency’s new searchable database.

Aside from launching the new patent database, in a move that could immensely benefit private space technology companies, NASA added 56 carefully selected patents to those already included in the public domain to make them available for commercial use without any restrictions.

This scientific step is expected to benefit many private space technology companies like Bigelow Aerospace Space X, RedWorks whose findings are inspired by NASA researches.

 

“By releasing this collection into the public domain, we are encouraging entrepreneurs to explore new ways to commercialize NASA technologies,”
said Daniel Lockney, NASA’s Technology Transfer program executive.

“By making these technologies available in the public domain, we are helping foster a new era of entrepreneurship that will again place America at the forefront of high-tech manufacturing and economic competitiveness,”
Lockney said.

 

The technologies include advanced manufacturing processes, sensors, propulsion methods, rocket nozzles, thrusters, aircraft wing designs and improved rocket safety and performance concepts.

By releasing select NASA patents into the public domain, NASA believes it can help private companies save significant time, money and effort on their own commercial projects, which would otherwise require these firms to either create alternative designs or pay out large sums of money just to secure licensing agreements.

NASA has been known to allow small businesses to use its expired patents for free in the past, but this time, the space agency is giving even ordinary people access to its collection of patents.

 

 

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Ayush Garg

Content Developer. Strategist. (A true) Startup Enthusiast. A kind of a guy who relies on analysis, and writes to spoil the masks. A threat to humor, if one liners could kill. Twitter: @profylayush.

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